European Union

Consensus Building Among Lawmakers That EU Must Designate Hezbollah In Its Entirety

Leaders of the European Union (EU) last week received an unprecedented letter from 235 lawmakers representing 30 nations and 25 EU member states, urging the body to ban Iran’s Lebanese proxy Hezbollah and designate it in its entirety as a terrorist group. The letter, known as the Transatlantic Declaration on Hezbollah, was sent to Brussels ahead of the July 18 anniversary of the 1994 bombing of the AMIA Jewish Cultural Center in Buenos Aires and the 2012 bombing of a passenger bus carrying Israeli tourists at the Burgas Airport in Bulgaria. Hezbollah was linked to both terrorist attacks.

Tech & Terrorism: EU Anti-Terror Law Facing Opposition From Big Tech

The European Union’s (EU) proposed Terrorist Content Regulation continues to face opposition from major tech companies including Google/YouTube and Microsoft. The new regulation would allow EU member states to impose fines on tech firms of up to four percent of their revenue for failure to consistently remove extremist content from their platforms. It would also require a takedown of said extremist content within one hour of receiving notice from public authorities. Given tech companies’ consistent inability to enforce their own terms of service, the EU’s proposal is part of a growing trend by legislative bodies to prescribe content moderation policies in an effort to stymie the spread of extremist and terrorist material online. The Terrorist Content Regulation builds upon Germany’s pioneering 2018 Network Enforcement Act (NetzDG).

Right-Wing Groups In EU Gaining Political Clout

Right-wing extremist groups have traditionally rejected democratic values, particularly equality. They have, however, used the democratic process to gain strength across Europe in recent years. Last year, right-wing extremist political parties...