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Report: Guide to Online Propagandists

More must be done to stop extremist radicalization

In November 2017, YouTube adopted a policy prohibiting content from al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula propagandist Anwar al-Awlaki. YouTube’s decision is a positive step, but there is no shortage of extremist actors and ideologues online. Content featuring other propagandists remains widely available on YouTube and other social media platforms. Content from individuals with links to violent extremist actors should be removed from online platforms...

Daily Eye on Extremism

May 18, 2018
“An initiative by YouTube to minimize the exposure of videos advocating extremism is falling short, according to a new report from researchers with the Counter Extremism Project (CEP). The report criticizes the effectiveness of YouTube's efforts to suppress extremist videos and promote content that could dissuade potential recruits from joining terror groups. YouTube, which is owned by Google, incorporated aspects of the "Redirect Method" last year. The program uses advertising to steer users away from extremist content in search results and toward a playlist of pre-existing videos that debunk the ideology of violent extremists. The Redirect Program was developed in part by Jigsaw, Google's innovation arm.  But the researchers with CEP say they were three times more likely to encounter videos with extremist content in search results than videos that combat the propaganda. Between April 3 and April 4, 2018, they searched YouTube using four keywords that the Redirect Method says indicate "positive sentiments" toward the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS).”CBS News: YouTube's Efforts To Combat Extremist Videos Falling Short, Researchers Say “An initiative by YouTube to minimize the exposure of videos advocating extremism is falling short, according to a new report from researchers with the Counter Extremism Project (CEP). The report criticizes the effectiveness of YouTube's efforts to suppress extremist videos and promote content that could dissuade potential recruits from joining terror groups. YouTube, which is owned by Google, incorporated aspects of the "Redirect Method" last year. The program uses advertising to steer users away from extremist content in search results and toward a playlist of pre-existing videos that debunk the ideology of violent extremists. The Redirect Program was developed in part by Jigsaw, Google's innovation arm.  But the researchers with CEP say they were three times more likely to encounter videos with extremist content in search results than videos that combat the propaganda. The authors of the report called Google's efforts to promote counter-narrative content "inconsistent and insufficient. "The only thing that is clear is YouTube and others still have significant problems with online extremism and current measures are not nearly enough," David Ibsen, executive director for the Counter Extremism Project, said in a statement.”The Wall Street Journal: Faraway ISIS Branches Grow As ‘Caliphate’ Fades In Syria And Iraq CBS News: Report: YouTube Failing At Combating Extremism: CEP Deputy Director Lara Pham Discusses A New CEP Report Showing That Google-Owned YouTube's Program To Suppress Extremist Videos And Promote Counter-Narrative Content Is "Insufficient And Inconsistent." “The United Nations and Iraqi political leaders on Thursday called for investigating electoral-fraud complaints and sought manual recounts in some districts, as questions intensified about the legitimacy of the country’s recent parliamentary vote. Overall, the recounts being sought aren’t expected to affect the surprising election results from Saturday, when Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr’s coalition won the most seats. But the fraud claims have delayed the official tally of the vote and deepened Iraqis mistrust in the electoral process, which saw turnout fall to its lowest level since the country became a democracy fifteen years ago. Less than 45% of voters participated in the election, a low number considered a factor in Mr. Sadr’s victory because his largely poor, dedicated followers showed up when other politicians’ bases stayed home. Mr. Sadr’s militias had fought against the U.S. following the 2003 invasion and were accused of sectarian atrocities but he has forged a more mainstream path in recent years. Lawmakers on Thursday called an emergency session of parliament on Saturday to discuss the allegations of fraud after parties from across the political spectrum raised doubts.”The Wall Street Journal: Questions Mount About Possible Fraud In Iraq Vote “Brazilian federal prosecutors have charged 11 people with planning to establish an Islamic State cell in Brazil and trying to recruit jihadists to send to Syria, according to a court filing. Police tracked the alleged Isis militants through their social media messages after Spain’s Guardia Civil provided telephone numbers found on a Brazilian arrested in Spain for belonging to a jihadist group there. In one WhatsApp chat group, some of the Brazilian suspects discussed plans to copy last year’s London Bridge attack during Carnival in Rio de Janeiro or Salvador to kill as many people as possible, the document said. Two of the Brazilians are being held in a maximum-security prison and five others, arrested since October, were freed pending trial, said a spokesman for the prosecutors office for the state of Goiás in central Brazil that filed the charges. Police found homemade weapons in the house of one of the suspects, who identified himself in social media messages as a supporter of the militant Islamic movement al-Qaida.”The Guardian: Brazil Charges 11 People With Attempting To Establish ISIS Cell
Daily Dose
Extremists: Their Words. Their Actions.

Jews know that the Sunnis will not pose any danger to them… are the leaders of the Islamic world today not Sunni? Are they not the ones who agreed, who hurried to agree, that America is to lead the world against what is referred to as terrorism?
 

Hussein al-Houthi, Houthis Founder

The Counter Extremism Project acts to shine a light of transparency and accountability on those persons, businesses and institutions that financially underpin the activities of extremist groups.

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