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Press Release

Extremist Content Online: Neo-Nazi Manifesto Siege Re-Emerges For Sale On Lulu Despite Previous Removal for TOS Violation

The Counter Extremism Project (CEP) reports weekly on the methods used by extremists to exploit the Internet and social media platforms to recruit followers and incite violence. Last week, three separate uploads of James Mason ’s neo-Nazi manifesto Siege were made available for purchase on the website Lulu, a print-on-demand, self-publishing, and distribution online marketplace that halted sales of the book from its site in April 2019. Additionally, CEP researchers located the website for a North American-based neo-Nazi group which features essays idolizing Adolf Hitler and national socialism, and encourage the spread of anti-Semitism and racism.
Extremism News Roundup

Eye on Extremism: May 26, 2020

“Islamic State said on Monday it was behind a blast in a small town in southern Libya on Saturday, the militant group's first attack in the country for at least a year. The blast targeted a security point at the entrance to Taraghin, 780 km (590 miles) south of Tripoli, but did not cause any...
Extremism News Roundup

Eye on Extremism: May 22, 2020

“The British government warned it will prosecute protesters who break the law if Hezbollah flags are displayed in online demonstrations. In a change of policy in response to the coronavirus outbreak, the Home Office announced to The National that it will observe protests on Zoom and other...
Press Release

Tech & Terrorism: Tech’s Activist Role In Content Moderation Undermines Industry Arguments For Section 230 Protections

Technology giants like Facebook, Twitter, and Google/YouTube have long maintained that they are merely neutral platforms and cannot be held responsible for what users choose to post and share on their sites. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act (CDA) has provided blanket liability protection to encourage tech firms to proactively remove hateful, abusive, violent, and other unwanted content from their sites. Instead of availing themselves of the freedom to properly enforce their Terms of Service under the protection afforded by Section 230, tech companies have done the bare minimum to rein in dangerous content, while using the liability shield to fend of lawsuits from victims of terrorism.