Extremist Content Online: Al-Qaeda Bomb-Making Materials Shared By User On White Supremacist Forum

(New York, N.Y.) – The Counter Extremism Project (CEP) reports weekly on the methods used by extremists to exploit the Internet and social media platforms to recruit followers and incite violence. A user of an imageboard on the dark web shared a collection of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula’s magazine Inspire, with the intention that the explosives guides and other information contained in them would help white supremacists commit acts of terrorism. Last week, ISIS-affiliated Amaq News released a video allegedly showing a roadside bombing of a vehicle near Raqqah, Syria.

Meanwhile, CEP researchers located a website dedicated to an Austrian neo-Nazi rapper, whose arrest was first reported on February 2, that contains news related to the case and includes information for sending money via cash apps and cryptocurrency to allegedly aid in his legal defense. Finally, CEP researchers located bomb-making instructions in Russian on Telegram’s Telegra.ph feature.

Al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula Magazines Including Explosives Guides Shared on White Supremacist Dark Web Imageboard

On March 3, a user of an imageboard on the dark web shared a collection of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula’s magazine Inspire, with the intention that the explosives guides and other information contained in them would help white supremacists commit acts of terrorism. The files were shared via a download site, which removed them after they were reported by CEP. The imageboard venerates white supremacist terrorists and encourages others to follow their actions. The board has previously encouraged mass casualty attacks to further accelerationist goals.

Amaq News Video Released

On March 1, ISIS-affiliated Amaq News released a video allegedly showing a roadside bombing of a vehicle near Raqqah, Syria. ISIS online supporters shared the footage on Telegram and Hoop and spread links on RocketChat. The video was uploaded to at least seven websites: File.Fm, PixelDrain, Top4top, Dropbox, the Microsoft One Drive, the Internet Archive, and Mega.Nz. Approximately 48 hours later, the video was still available on Top4Top and the Internet Archive in addition to Telegram and Hoop.

Website Dedicated to Jailed Austrian Neo-Nazi Rapper Raises Cryptocurrency

CEP researchers located a website dedicated to the Austrian neo-Nazi rapper “Mr. Bond,” whose arrest was first reported on February 2. The website contains news related to the case and includes information for sending money via cash apps and cryptocurrency to allegedly aid in his legal defense. As of March 4, the site had raised approximately $2,400 through Bitcoin donations alone. In a message shared publicly on Telegram, the website’s creator spoke about how the rapper had inspired him or her to create white power music and their hope that it would one day inspire others to commit acts that would threaten the government and perceived opponents. The website uses Cloudflare as its name server and NetEarth as its registrar.

According to Austrian authorities, the accused is charged with “producing and broadcasting Nazi ideas and incitement to hatred.” It is also alleged that he translated the Christchurch terrorist’s manifesto into German. Mr. Bond’s music was played during the live stream of the October 2019 Halle Attack.

Bomb Making Instructions Located on Telegram Bulletin Board Feature Telegra.ph

CEP researchers located bomb-making instructions in Russian on Telegram’s Telegra.ph feature. Telegra.ph functions similarly to a bulletin board, allowing users to share content with individuals who do not have Telegram accounts. Several guides were found, including instructions for making different types of homemade explosives, detonators, booby traps, and incendiary weapons. The posts contained multiple references in support of neo-Nazism and encouraged acts of violence. The Telegra.ph pages had been online for approximately one year. The Telegram channel that posted the Telegra.ph links had about 950 subscribers on March 4. An affiliated Telegram channel had over 2,000 subscribers on March 4, encouraged acts of terrorism, and posted neo-Nazi propaganda and James Mason’s book Siege. The Telegra.ph links were removed by Telegram after they were reported by CEP, however no action was taken against the public channel that posted them.

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Explosives symbol used as a header on Telegra.ph homemade explosives instructional guides

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