Mohamed Bailor Jalloh

Mohamed Bailor Jalloh is a U.S. citizen and former member of the U.S. Army who pled guilty in October 2016 to attempting to provide material support to ISIS.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 12, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. Jalloh admittedly attempted to donate money to the terror group and carry out a domestic attack in its name.“Former Army National Guard Member Arrested for Attempting to Provide Material Support to ISIL,” U.S. Department of Justice, June 5, 2016, https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/former-army-national-guard-member-arrested-attempting-provide-material-support-isil.

Jalloh reportedly grew radicalized while serving in the Virginia National Guard between 2009 and 2015.Rachel Weiner and Joe Heim, “Former National Guardsman accused of plotting attack to support ISIS,” Washington Post, July 5, 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/former-national-guardsman-accused-of-plotting-attack-to-support-isis/2016/07/05/317eb4f0-42c1-11e6-8856-f26de2537a9d_story.html. According to an FBI affidavit, Jalloh quit the National Guard after he began listening to lectures by deceased al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula cleric Anwar al-Awlaki. Media reports referring to Awlaki as a “hate preacher” allegedly prompted Jalloh to research the Yemeni cleric and listen to his online lectures, according to the affidavit. During conversations with an FBI Confidential Human Source (CHS) in the first half of 2016, Jalloh allegedly said that Awlaki explained that it was incumbent upon every able Muslim to resist America in Iraq and Afghanistan. Jalloh also said that Awlaki’s lectures helped him to “understand” that after ISIS announced its so-called caliphate, “this was the reality.”“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 6, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download.

Following service in the National Guard, Jalloh traveled to Africa, where he stayed between July 2015 and January 2016. While in Nigeria, according to FBI investigators, Jalloh first established contact with an ISIS operative who later introduced Jalloh to the CHS.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 4, 7, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. Jalloh told the CHS in April 2016 that he wished to carry out a domestic attack similar to the Fort Hood shootings carried out by Nidal Hasan in 2009.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 7, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. Jalloh also allegedly spoke about targeting an unidentified person who had organized several “Draw Muhammad” cartoon contests.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 9, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download.

In May 2016, the CHS introduced Jalloh to an undercover FBI agent posing as an ISIS member.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 10, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. During conversations on an unidentified mobile messaging service, Jalloh allegedly told the agent that it was best to plan an attack during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. He allegedly believed such violent operations were “100 percent the right thing to do,” and he prayed to Allah to make him a martyr.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 8-9, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. Jalloh allegedly gave the agent $500, believing it would reach ISIS’s coffers.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 12, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download.

On July 1, 2016, Jalloh entered the Blue Ridge Arsenal gun store and firing range in Chantilly, Virginia. According to security footage and the store’s owner, Jalloh allegedly tried to purchase a Bushmaster AR-15, but did not have adequate identification.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 13, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download; Rachel Weiner and Joe Heim, “Former National Guardsman accused of plotting attack to support ISIS,” Washington Post, July 5, 2016, https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/former-national-guardsman-accused-of-plotting-attack-to-support-isis/2016/07/05/317eb4f0-42c1-11e6-8856-f26de2537a9d_story.html. Jalloh returned the following day and purchased a Stag Arms 5.56 caliber assault rifle.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 13, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. The FBI arrested him on July 3 and charged him with attempting to provide material support to ISIS. Jalloh pled guilty on October 27, 2016.“United States of America v. Mohamed Bailor Jalloh Affidavit in Support of a Criminal Complaint,” U.S. Department of Justice, July 3, 2016, 12, https://www.justice.gov/opa/file/873091/download. He was sentenced to 11 years in prison on February 10, 2017. In a letter to the court, alloh reportedly renounced ISIS and its “superficial and dishonest interpretation of Islam.”“Ex-Guardsman gets 11 years for Islamic State group support,” Associated Press, February 10, 2017, http://bigstory.ap.org/article/c575f77b512d49b4ac5cfa79012f1c05/ex-guardsman-be-sentenced-islamic-state-group-support.

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