Gregory Hubbard

Gregory Hubbard is an American citizen who was arrested on July 21, 2016, along with Dayne Atani Christian and Darren Arness Jackson, for conspiring and attempting to provide material support to ISIS. Hubbard expressed praise and support for ISIS and ISIS-related acts of terrorism, and also made arrangements to travel to Syria with a confidential FBI source in order to join ISIS and engage in acts of terrorism. He was arrested at Miami International Airport before his intended departure.“Two Florida Men Plead Guilty to Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIL,” U.S. Department of Justice, April 4, 2017, https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdfl/pr/two-florida-men-plead-guilty-conspiring-provide-material-support-isil;
“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

Hubbard was born in Albany, Georgia.John Pacenti, “ISIS in Florida: Former FBI agent on why arrests didn’t come sooner,” Palm Beach Post, July 24, 2017, http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/isis-florida-former-fbi-agent-why-arrests-didn-come-sooner/Pezdh6eBg1C3B1zVDMKVuI/. He entered the U.S. Marine Corps at age 19, working in aviation supply, but later made his living as an artist and sculptor.Mimi Pirrault, “ISIS in Florida: 2007 Post profile of artist Gregory Hubbard,” Palm Beach Post, July 23, 2016, http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/isis-florida-2007-post-profile-artist-gregory-hubbard/PyoJHEAZtb9tLmY2M2eqhM/;
Paula McMahon, “Guilty pleas expected for two Palm Beach County men arrested in terror sting,” Sun Sentinel, March 14, 2017, http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-reg-palm-beach-terror-sting-update-20170314-story.html.
Hubbard reportedly became depressed and homeless after falling victim to fraud, although court records reveal that he sought treatment for his mental health issues.Skyler Swisher, “Three Palm Beach County men plead not guilty in alleged conspiracy to help terrorists,” Sun Sentinel, July 27, 2016, http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-palm-isil-arraignment-20160727-story.html;
Paula McMahon, “Guilty pleas expected for two Palm Beach County men arrested in terror sting,” Sun Sentinel, March 14, 2017, http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-reg-palm-beach-terror-sting-update-20170314-story.html.

At some point in 2015, Hubbard was contacted by a confidential FBI informant pretending to be an ISIS follower.Paula McMahon, “Second man pleads guilty in Palm Beach terrorism sting,” Sun Sentinel, April 4, 2017, http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-pn-terrorism-sting-plea-palm-beach-20170403-story.html;
“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 5, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.
Hubbard––also known as “Jibreel”––introduced the FBI informant to Christian on August 15, 2015, and to Jackson on May 11, 2016.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 4-5, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. The FBI informant would record more than 200 hours of conversation among Christian, Jackson, and Hubbard over the course of the subsequent year.Jane Musgrave, “Second PBC man pleads guilty in plot to help ISIS,” Palm Beach Post, April 4, 2017, http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/crime--law/second-pbc-man-pleads-guilty-plot-help-isis/8o3UPtnn7sX8YgYv0trNCP/. The men reportedly used code words to communicate, including the phrase “soccer team” in reference to ISIS, and “playing soccer” in reference to violent activity.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 5, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

Hubbard was known to engage with and propagate extremist propaganda on multiple occasions, including ISIS videos and lectures by the American al-Qaeda cleric Anwar al-Awlaki. In April of 2015, Hubbard emailed the FBI informant a 100-page manual in e-book form published by ISIS for its supporters. Hubbard told the informant that he previously wrote two articles that he sent to ISIS for publication, and was currently working on a third.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 6, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. He sent the manual to the informant again on November 2, also mentioning some ISIS-related videos that he had watched.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 7, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. In June 2016, Hubbard discussed violent ISIS videos with Christian and the FBI source, expressing “favorable views” of at least one of the videos, according to the criminal complaint filed against him.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 13, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On other occasions that same month, Hubbard played an Awlaki lecture on his phone for the FBI informant and sent a group text message containing a link to an Awlaki video that encouraged violent jihad.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 15, 18, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

Hubbard also explicitly expressed support and praise for ISIS and ISIS-related acts of terrorism, as detailed by the criminal complaint filed against him. On one occasion, he stated that there were only two types of people, those with ISIS and those against ISIS, and deemed ISIS to be “exciting.”“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 6, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. He also stated that “jihad is the skin of Islam” and that the only way to deal with one’s enemy was to “cut off his head.”“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 7, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. Hubbard publicly praised the December 2, 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino and claimed that the attack and other instances of violent jihad were justified by the U.S.-led airstrikes in Syria.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 7-8, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. He also praised the 2009 mass shooting in Fort Hood, Texas, stating that the shooter did the right thing.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 8, 10, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On another occasion, Hubbard told Christian that if he left town, would leave behind ammunition for one of Christian’s “own mission[s],” according to the criminal complaint filed against him.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 17, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. Hubbard stated that he “wanted to bring America to its knees” and hoped that ISIS would attack the Pentagon or the White House.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 10, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. In July 2016, Hubbard praised both the terrorist attack in Nice, France, and the shooting of police officers in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the day after each respective attack occurred.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 19, 20, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

Hubbard intended to travel to Syria to join ISIS and wage violent jihad there, making definite arrangements for his travel. He applied for a renewed passport in August of 2015 and received it on December 9.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 6, 8, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. Upon receiving it, Hubbard became “excited” and stated that it was time to travel to Syria, according to the criminal complaint filed against him.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 8, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On March 3, 2016, Hubbard indicated to the FBI informant that he wanted to leave soon, and discussed logistics concerning flights, storage of personal belongings, and finances.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 11-12, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. Later that month, he stated that he intended to depart that summer and not return to the United States.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 12, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On May 17, Hubbard solicited the FBI informant’s opinion on travel routes to Syria.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 12, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. Later that month, in preparation for his departure, Hubbard packed his personal belongings into a rental moving truck and transported them to a storage unit in Albany, Georgia.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 13, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On June 7, Hubbard booked an airline ticket from Miami, Florida, to Berlin, Germany, and researched train travel from Berlin to Istanbul, Turkey, where he intended to travel before crossing the border to Syria. He also sold his van a few days later.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 15, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On June 20, Hubbard and the FBI source booked a hotel reservation for Berlin, as Hubbard wanted it to appear that they were legitimate tourists.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 17, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On July 18, Hubbard discussed finances for the trip with the FBI informant, declaring that he would bring $6,000. On this date, Hubbard also gave the FBI informant several boxes of his artwork to store at the informant’s place of residence, stating that he did not plan to return from Syria.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 20-21, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

Also in preparation for his travel to Syria, Hubbard attended target practice at local shooting ranges with Jackson, Christian, and the FBI source between May and July of 2016.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. At one practice, Hubbard remarked that he felt persecuted because he was Muslim and assumed that the others at the shooting range were training to kill Muslims.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 5-6, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf. On another instance, he brought his own weapons to the practice and provided his companions with instructions on the handling of firearms.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 15-16, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf.

On July 21, 2016, Jackson drove Hubbard and the FBI agent in his car from West Palm Beach to Miami International Airport, so that they could depart on a flight bound for Berlin, Germany, from where they planned to travel to Syria to join ISIS. Hubbard was arrested at the airport after he and the FBI informant obtained their boarding passes and cleared the TSA checkpoint.“United States of America v. Gregory Hubbard, Dayne Antani Christian, and Darren Arness Jackson,” George Washington University’s Center for Cyber & Homeland Security, July 22, 2016, 21, https://cchs.gwu.edu/sites/cchs.gwu.edu/files/downloads/Hubbard%20Complaint.pdf;
“Two Florida Men Plead Guilty to Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIL,” U.S. Department of Justice, April 4, 2017, https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdfl/pr/two-florida-men-plead-guilty-conspiring-provide-material-support-isil.

On July 26, 2016, Hubbard was indicted with charges of conspiring and attempting to provide personnel to ISIS, a designated foreign terrorist organization, as he expressed support for ISIS and made an attempt to travel to Syria to join ISIS himself.“Two Florida Men Plead Guilty to Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIL,” U.S. Department of Justice, April 4, 2017, https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdfl/pr/two-florida-men-plead-guilty-conspiring-provide-material-support-isil. Although Christian and Jackson pled guilty to their charges of material support, Hubbard continued to fight his allegations.Paula McMahon, “Second man pleads guilty in Palm Beach terrorism sting,” Sun Sentinel, April 4, 2017, http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/palm-beach/fl-pn-terrorism-sting-plea-palm-beach-20170403-story.html;
“Two Florida Men Plead Guilty to Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIL,” U.S. Department of Justice, April 4, 2017, https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdfl/pr/two-florida-men-plead-guilty-conspiring-provide-material-support-isil.

On February 8, 2018, Hubbard pleaded guilty to conspiring to provide material support to ISIS.Jennifer Tinter, “West Palm Beach Man Pleads Guilty to Conspiring with ISIS,” WPTV Channel 5, February 9, 2018, https://www.wptv.com/news/region-c-palm-beach-county/west-palm-beach/west-palm-beach-man-pleads-guilty-to-conspiring-with-isis; David J. Neal, “He Wanted to Join Islamic State. He Got as Far as Airport Security,” Miami Herald, February 13, 2018, https://www.miamiherald.com/news/state/florida/article199701919.html. On May 16, 2018, he was sentenced to 12 years in prison, followed by a lifetime of post-release supervision. His codefendants were sentenced on the same day: Christian was sentenced to eight years in prison, while Jackson was sentenced to four years in prison.“Three Florida Men Sentenced for Conspiring to Provide Material Support to ISIS,” U.S. Department of Justice – Office of Public Affairs, May 16, 2018, https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/three-florida-men-sentenced-conspiring-provide-material-support-isis; Chuck Weber, “Men Sentenced in 'Homegrown' Terrorism Case,” CBS 12 News, May 16, 2018, https://cbs12.com/news/local/men-sentenced-in-homegrown-terrorism-case.

Hubbard is currently incarcerated at Schuylkill Federal Correction Institution in Pennsylvania, with a scheduled release date of November 21, 2026.“GREGORY HUBBARD,” Find an Inmate – Federal Bureau of Prisons, accessed April 7, 2021, https://www.bop.gov/inmateloc/.

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