Media coverage/analysis of group

During the 2011 revolution that toppled Egypt’s Mubarak regime, Western media found they had to explain the Muslim Brotherhood to audiences unfamiliar with the group. This created an opportunity for the Brotherhood to spin its introduction to the Western public, as Brotherhood senior official Mohammed Morsi did in an op-ed in London’s Guardian newspaper in February 2011, days before Mubarak’s fall from power. The Brotherhood is “at the heart of Egyptian society,” Morsi wrote.Muhammad Mursi, “This Is Egypt’s Revolution, Not Ours,” Guardian (London), February 7, 2011, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/feb/08/egypt-revolution-muslim-brotherhood-democracy. Speaking directly to Western readers, Morsi listed the Mubarak government’s crimes against the Brotherhood, painting the organization as another victim of the repressive regime, “constantly targeted by some of the most brutal government measures.”Muhammad Mursi, “This Is Egypt’s Revolution, Not Ours,” Guardian (London), February 7, 2011, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/feb/08/egypt-revolution-muslim-brotherhood-democracy. The Brotherhood, according to Morsi, aims “to remove all forms of injustice, tyranny, autocracy and dictatorship, and we call for the implementation of a democratic multiparty all-inclusive political system that excludes no one.”Muhammad Mursi, “This Is Egypt’s Revolution, Not Ours,” Guardian (London), February 7, 2011, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/feb/08/egypt-revolution-muslim-brotherhood-democracy. Intentionally or not, the Guardian gave the Brotherhood a platform to appeal to international audiences.

Daily Dose

Extremists: Their Words. Their Actions.

In Their Own Words:

God forbid, if a time comes when we have no choice but to watch our citizens breathe their final breaths, and when there are no ventilators… we will make six million Israeli settlers unable to breathe.

Yahya Sinwar, Leader of Hamas in Gaza Apr. 2, 2020
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